The Signs & Symptoms of An Asthma Attack

Asthma is an incurable disease that affects the lungs and makes it difficult to breath. The muscles within the bronchi spasm, causing tightening around the airways. As the airway narrows it makes it difficult to breathe especially breathe out. Asthma can affect all ages, from kids all the way to adulthood. There are two types of asthma, which ultimately determines the cause of it. Asthma attacks can occur at anytime, any place and for any reason without any precursor. An asthma attack begins by three changes within the lungs, bronchospasms, inflammation and mucus production. These changes stimulate a chain reaction, which bring about the symptoms of an asthma attack. Everyone who experiences or has experienced an asthma attack have different frequency and severity of their symptoms.

Every time an asthma attack occurs there are early warning signs that can depict the onset of an attack. People who suffer with asthma for a long time are able to pick up on these signs, however, young children or undiagnosed cases of asthma may not realize these early signs until they are in a full fledged asthma attack. Early warning signs start well before you experience the symptoms of asthma. They may not be severe enough to stop daily activity but should be noticeable enough to realize what is going on. Some early warning symptoms are the same as the symptoms of an actual asthma attack, however they will worsen if left untreated. Frequent coughing especially at night, shortness of breath and wheezing can be early warning signs of an asthma attack and worsen once the actual attack goes into effect. Feeling tired, weakness, moodiness, irritability, trouble sleeping, dark circles under your eyes, sneezing, runny nose, itchy chin, nasal congestion, sore throat and headache are all early signs of an asthma attack. Additionally decreased lung function, reduced peak flow meter readings and inability to exercise due to weakness or fatigue can signify a later asthma attack.

People who…

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